At Work

I just spent two and a half hours at the office after work rewriting a flash fiction piece to submit. It’s off and away.

It’s a good thing. But my now back hurts, I’m tired (I’ve still got an hour commute ahead of me) and I don’t want to go running.

I’m feeling like working on my writing means sacrificing my marathon training. And vice versa. I need to figure out the balance between the two.

But first, I just need to get in the car and go home.

[Cross-posted to my livejournal. If you feel inclined, you can comment either here or there.]

Creating Poetry, by John Drury

I picked up this book because someone in an Amazon review called Creating Poetry a “muse disguised as paper”. It may not go that far, but it’s close. This book is full of writing prompts, each focused on the chapter’s subject, from Beginnings to Tone, Form, Research, Sound, Inspiration and more. There is plenty here for a poet to use and learn from, especially if they flip around from section to section, picking out prompts on an area of their writing they want to focus on. (I don’t think the best use is to read it from cover to cover as I did).

Occasionally, I thought the prompts for a particular subject were to specific, however, Drury encourages you to use this book as a jumping off point. It’s not necessary to follow the prompts to the letter, if the poem goes off in another direction.

Also, here is on of my responses to one of the prompts in the book. I followed a prompt focused on ghazal’s a form of poetry traditionally from the Middle East, which arranges the poem in a series of 5-10 couplets, rhymed on the same sound throughout and using the subject of love or wine to represent mystical experience. The prompt I used asked that the reader write a ghazal of my own. You’ll note that I dropped the rhyme, like many American poets do.

An Untitled Ghazal

The water in the vase is stagnant; the stems slimy.
A halo of petals on the table are emptied of fragrance.

We are always new, he says, always in the state of becoming new,
each dead cell replaced with its replicated offspring.

The leaves are dancing like translucent tissue paper.
The mottled light is bounding along the grass.

The days are an amalgamation of eyes blinking, hair growing,
lips parting, fingers thrumming over the flesh of the world.

He says, its not that time moves too quickly.
It’s that it moves too quickly.

The stars glimmer like fireflies trapped in tar.
The stars are a map of the freckles on your skin.

He says, silly rabbit, you have to have lived
what you lived in order to know what you know.

The Gerber Daisy leans against the glass.
A sun resides at the heart of its petals.

[Cross-posted to my livejournal. If you feel inclined, you may comment either here or there.]

“Beginning is easy — continuing hard” ~ Japanese Proverb

Technically this project began with the entries I wrote for January’s [info]brigits_flame contest (Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3, if you’re inclined to read them). As soon as I started writing these passages, along with about 712 words of back ground, I knew there was a much larger story that needed writing.

I’ve never thought about writing a werewolf novel. I definitely read werewolf stories and enjoyed them (Silver Kiss, by Naomie Clark is an excellent example), especially if they went beyond the wolf, but had never put much thought into writing them. The idea just hasn’t appealed to me much. Not only because the market is flooded with werewolf stories, but also because I haven’t particularly been drawn to the werewolf as a character. It hasn’t held the same fascination for me as witches have or even vampires did when I was younger. However, this story has got itself into my skull and presents what I hope is a new angle on the genre.

I’ve been letting the story slosh around in my brain for several weeks before coming back to it, and have since very roughly laid down what I know about the story, about my main character, some of the side characters, and of course, the villain. That’s the biggest one for me — the villain. I normally have a really hard time putting together a villain, one that’s not only dark or dangerous, but also has a purpose. This one just sort of jumped onto the page, full of mange and violence and rage, and I can’t wait to see what mischief I can get him up to.

I already know that this will be a young adult/teen book, and that I don’t want this to be a romance, but more of a bildungsroman.

And I know that Claire, my main character, only has enough wolf in her to be very strong, has a strong sense of smell, and is red-green colorblind, but doesn’t have enough wolf in her to shift into an actual wolf. I know she is extremely attached to her father and that she likes tragic stories from history, especially the life of Marie Antoinette.

I don’t have a title for it yet, which is typical, but not a big deal. I’ve started in on what might be Chapter 1. We’ll see where it goes.


Project:
Untitled Werewolf Novel
New Words: 952
Current Total Word Count: 6,310
Goal: ~80,000 (or until completed)

Random Sentence(s): Claire made an oompf sound as the box full of heavy books dropped into her arms. She awkwardly turned around and made her way down the ramp and into the house, depositing the box with the stacks of many others in what would soon be their living room once it was all put together.

Notes: Seems to be a good start. I already know this scene needs more to it. I don’t necessarily want to tell everything up front, but I want enough intrigue to the characters and the setting to hopefully keep a reader reading.

[Cross-posted to my livejournal. If you feel inclined, you may comment either here or there.]