Jun 27 2016

The Goings On

Oh, my. I’ve yet again skipped a week of my weekly updates, which makes them more bi-weekly for the month of June. The goings on are going on — mostly a lot of trying to get writing done and then binge watching television to recover from the trying to get writing done.

Announcements!

A Gathering of Baba Yagas,” a poem cowritten by Laura Madeline Wiseman and I, is now up at Strange Horizons! This was the first poem Madeline and I wrote together and I’m thrilled to see it published.

There is some other GIANT news, but I’m not 100% sure that it’s okay to share it yet, so I’m just going to tease you about it for the time being.

What I’m Reading

I haven’t been doing much reading lately. Or rather, I have, but not as much for the shear pleasure of it. So it’s a joy to begin All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders. The story of a naturalistic witch and a young mad scientist is charming. This is exactly the kind of book to get me back into the reading mood and I can’t wait to see where it leads.

What I’m Writing

Last week was primarily spent in finalizing and then submitting my Our Lady chapbook for publication. The collection, called Pantheon, is done and off and out of my hands and I’m going to say no more about that.

Since send that off, I’ve polished up The Things I Own, another chapbook which was a finalist in the Dirty Chaps Contest. With some tweaking — pulling out a couple of poems — and putting in of a couple of others, I’m hoping it will find a home elsewhere.

Coming up next is the Write Like Your Alive, a 31/31 project being hosted by Zoetic Press. Signups for the project are open until June 30th, with the opportunity to be published, if you complete at least 20 days. Let me know if you join, as I will definitely be participating (because why not drown myself in more challenges and projects) and would love to be able to share the journey.

Goals for the Week:

  • Prep for Write Like You’re Alive and then write like I’m alive

Linky Goodness

Justine Larbalestier has an amazing poet on How to Write Protagonists of Colour When You’re White: “Step One: Ask Yourself Why”

“All of the goals I had set for myself in my twenties had come and gone. As a result I had simply shut down. For some reason it felt easier and more comfortable to resign myself as a failure than to risk actual failure,” writes Kate Maruyama in On Saying Yes: Fight the Fear.


Jun 13 2016

I really don’t know how to write this post

The recent mass shooting in Orlando is taking up much of my heart and soul, so I’m putting my usual review down lower in the article and skipping to links I’ve found to be important and/or helpful.

It’s not enough to be mournful or to send prayers, as John Scalzi points out in his heart rending piece on “thoughts and prayers” in the face of continued violence. There’s a point where action has to be taken, and I’m looking for ways to offer what actual physical help I can.

The Huffington Post has a piece on How To Help Orlando Shooting Victims And Their Families.

Vox explains America’s gun problem:

“No other developed country in the world has anywhere near the same rate of gun violence as America. The US has nearly six times the gun homicide rate as Canada, more than seven times as Sweden, and nearly 16 times as Germany…

To understand why that is, there’s another important statistic: The US has by far the highest number of privately owned guns in the world.”

Petition to Ban Assault Weapons.

What I’m Reading

I haven’t had time to do much reading the last couple of weeks and so I haven’t started in to any novels or full length collections. The next on the list is The BFG by Roald Dahl, a reread of a book I loved when I was a kid. Something nostalgic and simple and sweet would be boon right now.

What I’m Writing

Last week was incredibly busy with deadlines looming both at my day job and for the chapbook I’ve been working on all through May and June — so busy that I never got around to writing about my time at Bay Area Book Fest, where I hung out with my Zoetic Press peeps. But Allie Marini wrote about it, so you can read that.

The chapbook is almost done — which is great, since the deadline is just two days away. Over the weekend, I’ve editing the hell out of a lot of poems, culled several that were just not coming together the way I wanted, and finalized many more. There are three poems remaining that are not quite ready, but I really want to include, so I’m desperately trying to work through them in time to submit.

Goals for the Week:

  • Finish and submit the 30/30 poetry collection
  • Breathe

Jun 2 2016

Culture Consumption: May 2016

For the past — I don’t know how long — I’ve been posting a monthly breakdown of the books and movies I’ve been watching with a short-ish review for every single one. But lately I haven’t had the time to write individual reviews. So I snagged the idea of Culture Consumption from Calico Writes, which combines all my monthly reading and watching and listening into one post.

Continue reading


May 31 2016

Time Flying By

I could write about my birthday celebrations last week and wading in the river until it soaked my pants and enjoying family and friends, but I’m currently too dazzled by the fact that it’s going to be June tomorrow and where did the time go, I want to know, where did it go.

What I’m Reading

I haven’t started in on a new novel yet, so right now my reading is focused on finishing the 2016 Rhysling Anthology. The speculative poetry inside these pages is pretty much consistently great, although there are certainly some favorites jumping out at me.

What I’m Writing

I’m approaching the deadline for this poetry collection that I’ve been editing, so I’m approaching the freak out stage of the process. (Okay, it’s all the freak out stage.) I need to polish up the poems I’m pretty sure I’m going to include and allow myself to let go of the rest, even though there’s a part of me that wants to force them into working, even though they may not be able to be forced.

Goals for the Week:

  • Continue editing the 30/30 poetry collection.
  • Submit a set of poems for publication

Linky Goodness

Gretchen Gerzina discusses the rediscovery of a 19th-century novel and how it transforms the image of black female writers.

“If your networks can’t help you reach out to awesomely skilled women, you need better networks,” writes Tin Geber on male privilege and networks.

We Need to Talk About That Wonder Woman Budget: It’s not all good news for Princess Diana of Themyscira, by Ashley Lynch.


May 23 2016

Rage Writing Through the Block

It was a frustrating week in writing, one of those weeks where you keep trying different routes to get into the words, only to come up against another wall.

One night this week, I sat with a set of poems in front of me. I picked up one poem, and then the next, and then the next — each time putting the poem back down into the pile after having just barely glancing at it. The feeling of frustration just kept building and building.

There’s a feeling of restriction, I find, in being artistically blocked. I find myself curling in, my muscles tightening up. It’s a feeling of not being able to move or act. And the more I feel I can’t write or act, the more I tighten the ball.

All I want to do is just scribble in rage until I tear through the page, I thought, while still trying to face the words I couldn’t seem to face.

Until I finally asked myself why I was avoiding it. If rage write what what I wanted to do and if it wasn’t really going to make things any worse, why not do it. So, I grabbed a red pen and started scrawling all the hate words and curses and anger out on to the page. I scribbled over what I wrote, I scratched over and I tore through the page, ripping a hole and gouging it open.

Rage writing might seem a counterproductive way to deal with an emotional block (which really what I think writer’s blocks are). But here’s the thing, it helped. It loosen up all that tension that had built up and allowed me to loosen. I started having fun with the scribbles, and they became more playful, less angry.

Not long after putting the page of rage writing down, I was able to pick up a poem and edit it into a finished piece that I’m rather happy with, allowing me to end the day with a feeling of accomplishment and calm.

I’m not saying rage writing is the solution for everyone facing a block, or for every time it comes up. There are a lot of ways to relax that tension and frustration. Other paths for other writers might do better with meditation, or taking a long walk, or reading an awesome book.

The point is there are creative solutions to finding your way around the wall.

Let me know what solutions you’ve found that work best for you in the comments.

What I’m Reading

I should have been able to finishe Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume, in just a few hours. But there have been numerous distractions, so I’m still in the process of reading. Good stuff so far.

Also about halfway through the 2016 Rhysling Anthology, which is full of amazing speculative poetry.

What I’m Writing

I talked about most of my writing week already. Another frustration was that I had put together a submission of poems, only to realize halfway through submitting that my intended submission did not fit the journal’s guidelines after all. So, I sighed and put it aside and began looking into where else to submit, but never actually got around to submitting.

Goals for the Week:

  • Continue editing the 30/30 poetry collection.
  • Submit a set of poems for publication

Linky Goodness

“If there is a thematic message encoded in the “girl” narratives, I think this is its key: the transition from girlhood to womanhood, from being someone to being someone’s wife, someone’s mother. Girl attunes us to what might be gained and lost in the transformation, and raises a possibility of reversion. To be called “just a girl” may be diminishment, but to call yourself “still a girl,” can be empowerment, laying claim to the unencumbered liberties of youth. As Gloria Steinem likes to remind us, women lose power as they age. The persistence of girlhood can be a battle cry,” writes Robin Wasserman in her wonderful exploration of what it means when we call women girls.

In The Unsung Heroes of the Poetry World, Krystal Languell talks with 11 poets on what it takes to run a small press.

Beyond Harry Potter: 25 Fantasy Adventure Series Starring Mighty Girls

Boston’s sidewalks are covered in secret poems, which are only revealed when it rains.